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seasonal brides bouquet

SEASONAL GROWING

Experience the season in flowers!

Growing...

Our planet earth friendly, British, seasonal flowers are grown organically and have a much lower carbon footprint than those grown across the globe or in fossil fuel heated greenhouses out of season. Plus it makes all the busy bees happy!

Being a grower as well as a florist, I love to plant and grow flowers that have many different qualities, some for their elegant shape and texture, others for their colour and scent. These, along with foraged greenery and other twiddly stems, create the most stunning floral arrangements. All my floral designs are inspired by the seasons. I can offer specific colour palettes but the best result would be achieved with ''what's looking the best on the day'' approach. 

Please see below my flowering calendar, it reflects the British growing seasons & runs throughout the year. It's just a guide as availability depends on the British weather and what local flower farmers have growing at any given time.

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...absolutely beautiful...

TESTIMONIAL

"The flowers I received were absolutely beautiful, rich in colour yet harmonious as a bouquet. They had a wonderful smell and lasted for ages"

Leon Baker

Spring

To bring in the wonderful fresh spring season, in March through to May, we start with stunning specialty daffodils and tulips, ranunculus, hellebores, anemones, arranged with forced cherry blossom, catkins and other foliage

spring flower bouquet
british tulips
British tulips in wheelbarrow
british grown ranunculus

Summer

From June into August we have roses, late ranunculus, alliums, sweetpeas,, alliums, orlaya, hesperis, sweet williams, peonies, nigella, cornflower, larkspur, ammi, daucus. Also first dahlias at the end of July going into August.

summer flower bouquet
flower bucket
summer flower bouquet
british garden roses

Autumn

With an autumnal change of season, from September right through to the first frosts at the end of October we have cosmos, sunflowers, hydrangeas, dahlias, chrysanthemums, zinnias and if weather is nice, second flush of the roses. Dried flowers and foliage are going into autumnal wreaths.

seasonal brides bouquet
Dahlias
british dahlias
natural autumn wreath
sweet peas

How to care for your blooms

There are a few steps you can take to ensure they last as long as possible.

 

Please remove all the packaging (compostable)  & recut the stems at an angle with sharp scissors, cutting around 1cm off the bottom & put them into a clean vase with cool clean water so they can have a good drink.

Ensure all the leaves & foliage below the water line is removed (this creates bacteria which will shorten the life of your flowers).

Keep out of direct sunlight & away from radiators & draughts. Avoid keeping near fruit which naturally produces an odorless gas that will shorten the life of your flowers. 

Check regularly for any dead or dying flowers & foliage that has fallen into the water & remove.

 

Change the water every couple of days & recut the stems. ​​​

Winter

For the final season of the year, from November through to February we are gearing up for Christmas wreaths and arrangements using different foliage, late chrysanthemums and dried flowers like statice, hydrangeas and colourful strawflowers. Planting tulips for the following Spring.
 

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